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Strategy and Protective Operations

Strategy. You hear this word a lot. Whether it’s managing a line of business or an operation, it feels like it is an imperative to understand and have strategy within your program. Without it though, it’s certain you risk forfeiting your activity and any long term gains you might hope to achieve with your protection efforts.

Obviously, the overarching goal is the protection of your designate(s).  So that’s our strategy, ‘nuff said, right?  Wrong.  That’s “the mission.”  Strategic thinking involves more, “Strategic thinking is a process that defines the manner in which people think about, assess, view, and create the future for themselves and others” (Ebersole, 2017).  Making longer decisions and plans require a bit more in order to support the operational mission.  With that in mind, here are a few thoughts to help you get started to set your strategy or, perhaps, evaluate your current one.

Understand the concept of risk based protection

Protection efforts and programs are started from ‘risk.’  Whether direct or indirect, it is this spark from which all stems.  However, risk is an asymmetrical beast.  It is both malleable and elusive, constantly trying to evade and undermine your actions.  To this end, you must have a process by which risk is being evaluated and qualified.

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Develop your risk model or system (easily searched) and ensure you use it.  It should and will be important to driving your long-term plans as well as helping decision making.

 

 

 

Resource management is a center of gravity

Every program must understand, set and track resources.  This is about more than financials, too.  It spreads to areas such as people and equipment, as well.  We need to value these items, as they are vital to keeping momentum within our organizations and ensure the protective program we have in place doesn’t lag.  It’s an important factor in a program’s readiness.

Placing and tracking value will help you identify trends in resources and allow you to become more predictable in those areas.  This will help earmark and deal with those areas you can’t, too.  Like those sudden fast balls or other operational surges.

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Think Three Dimensionally

Risk is not a balanced problem.  As a result, neither should your  approach to managing strategy be. As the missions remains  (to protect) you should always be looking at new angles of approach to the strategic vision.  It means looking at new optics of risk, while questioning your old ones.  Charles Koch suggested in his 2007 book, The Science of Success: How Market-Based Management Built the World’s Largest Private Company, “the principal of vision to ascertain [long term] value can and should be created in any organization, at any given time” (Koch, 2007).

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It’s important to constantly re-examine our risks and look for opportunities vice doing the same things we have always done and, perhaps, sense any black swans circling for opportunity to swoop in and throw us off of our operational mission.

Obviously, so much more to designing and maintaining a strategy.  It should be part of your regular meter to obsessively examine and track your strategic goals.

Hopefully, these ideas validated or generated some questions for you. How have you set and manage your protective team’s strategy?

 

Works Cited

Ebersole, J. G. (2017, NOV 15). Course and Direction. Retrieved from cssp.com: http://www.cssp.com/CD0808b/CriticalStrategicThinkingSkills/

Koch, C. G. (2007). The Science of Success: How Market-Based Management Built the World’s Largest Private Company. New York: Wiley.

 

 

 

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3 Thoughts towards being innovative

Innovative ~ in·no·va·tive [ˈinəˌvādiv]

Adjective (of a product, idea, etc.) featuring new methods; advanced and original: innovative designs

Innovation requires white space

When your mind is quiet, the best ideas will come to the surface. “when we quiet the mind through contemplative practices such as meditation, we eventually discover that awareness or consciousness exists beyond it.” (Jan Birchfield, 2013)

While this doesn’t necessarily mean, you have sit in a corner and contemplate your navel (although that also works) it suggests that, through common practices that allow our minds a break from the daily cacophony our subconscious to open and allow new thoughts forward.

 

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Innovation requires energy

When you think of people who are innovative, lack of exuberance is generally not associated with them.  People like Richard Branson or Tony Robbins are powerhouses of eRownergy.  Going to the gym is not enough, it requires a commitment to self that includes, basically, taking care of yourself; “The corporate athlete doesn’t build a strong physical foundation by exercise alone, of course. Good sleeping and eating rituals are integral to effective energy management.” (Jim Loehr, 2001)

Energy doesn’t dissipate, it only becomes something else.  So, with this in mind, it only makes sense to produce positive energy, starting with yourself, and put it out there.

 

 

Innovation requires learning

Warren Buffet’s partner, Charlie Munger said of his partner, “If you watched Warren Buffett with a time clock, I would say half of all the time he spends is just sitting on his ass and reading. And a big chunk of the rest of the time is spent talking on the phone or personally with people he trusts.” (Wu, 2014)  It is said Buffet read over 500 pages per week and, to this end, he has credited his success to that voracious reading.WP_20141230_004 3

With today’s technology ‘reading’ can be sought via many ways.  Whether through podcasts or newspapers that have an .mp3 function to audiobooks, there is not excuse to not have a bias-to-learn attitude.

 

Works Cited
Jan Birchfield, P. (2013, Jan 29). The Huffington Post: Blog. Retrieved from huffingtonpost.com: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jan-birchfield-phd/business-innovation_b_2563774.html
Jim Loehr, T. S. (2001, Jan). The Making of a Corporate Athlete. Harvard Business Review.
Wu, G. (2014, Oct 16). Gary Wu Personal Development. Retrieved from garywu.next: http://www.garywu.net/influential-people-importance-reading/

 

— AFTER THE CREDIT SCENE —

Innovation requires listening

True connection comes from real connections and thankfulness.  No room here for false platitudes, take time and actively listen to what’s going on around you.  Whether in meetings or at home, listen to learn

END OF THE YEAR COFFEE…A REDUX

Just over a year ago I wrote about having that Your End Of The Year Coffee With… Yourself.  Basically, my thoughts were about putting some time aside to reflect, review and renew what you have just gone through, how it aligned with your goals and what changes (if anything) over the next year you want to make.

Now’s the time

This time of year is good to mull over those thoughts and take stock in your activities.  I still believe in taking out a piece of paper and writing headlines along the top in order to help guide yourself.  Along with this, it’s also time to be disruptive to yourself.  No, I don’t mean, “wind-sprints- ‘till-you-drop.” Ask some additional questions to help pull out some constructively disruptive ideas as they could lead to both creative and innovative pathways.

“The only man who never makes mistakes is the man who never does anything.”

 Theodore Roosevelt

Disorderly for Goodness’ Sake

I’m a fan of #TimFerriss and while I don’t subscribe to everything he does, I follow most of his stuff.  Ferriss believes in taking time for self-reflection and openly thinking about ways to mix things up.  If you want some additional motivation, listen to this recent podcast from the polymath on being a better version of you.

While you are at it, brainstorm about how to mix up your own environment (work or personal) by jotting down the first ten things that come into your mind if asked, “How could I positively disrupt my pattern over the next three months?” or (as Ferriss suggests), “If I needed to accomplish [all] my goals in the next six months, what would I need to focus on?”  If you stop and think about the last bit there for a second… it’s kind of powerful and worth repeating; If you had to get it all done in six months…. what do you need to focus on, right now, to set up the win?

The Forest and the Trees

Why should someone do this?  Because looking over the master plan and ensuring you’re still on course helps you see your goals and take stock in those things you are doing right.  When reflecting upon conducting warfare President Dwight B. Eisenhower once mused, “In preparing for battle I have always found that plans are useless, but planning is indispensable.”  By planning, we make it easier to stay of course when random acts of the universe come to mix things up…and you know they will.

 

“Every time I find myself stressed out, it’s because I do things primarily driven by growth.”

Tim Ferriss

 

As for me, this year I was fortunate enough to get away and discover some white space this last week. With no electronics (except for the ever-present smart phone for emergencies) or distractions, I had a few days of reading, reflecting and note taking.  And yes, I also found some quiet time for my own cup of coffee with myself…and a friend.

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Note: Last year several people wrote back to me and shared their own thoughts after having that cup o’ joe with themselves and (more importantly) what they discovered.    Let me know how yours goes too.

Keep your head down